Give Us Hearts that Burn O Lord

William Cowper says in one of his letters
that he once was friends with a man of fine taste
who confessed to him that
although he could not subscribe to the truth of Christianity,
he could never read this passage in Luke’s Gospel (the Emmaus Walk – Luke 24)
without being deeply affected by it,
and feeling that
if the stamp of divinity was impressed upon anything in the Scriptures,
it was upon that passage.

Below is a portion of Cowper’s poem entitled “Conversation.”
Read it slowly savoring each one and envisioning that memorable walk to Emmaus!

It happen’d on a solemn eventide,
Soon after He that was our surety died,
Two bosom friends, each pensively inclined,
The scene of all those sorrows left behind,
Sought their own village, busied as they went
In musings worthy of the great event:
They spake of him they loved, of him whose life,
Though blameless, had incurr’d perpetual strife,
Whose deeds had left, in spite of hostile arts,
A deep memorial graven on their hearts.
The recollection, like a vein of ore,
The farther traced enrich’d them still the more;

They thought him, and they justly thought him, one
Sent to do more than he appear’d to have done,
To exalt a people, and to place them high
Above all else, and wonder’d he should die.
Ere yet they brought their journey to an end,
A stranger join’d them, courteous as a friend,
And ask’d them with a kind engaging air
What their affliction was, and begg’d a share.
Inform’d, he gathered up the broken thread,
And truth and wisdom gracing all he said,
Explain’d, illustrated, and search’d so well
The tender theme on which they chose to dwell,
That reaching home, the night, they said is near,
We must not now be parted, sojourn here.

The new acquaintance soon became a guest,
And made so welcome at their simple feast,
He bless’d the bread, but vanish’d at the word,
And left them both exclaiming, ’Twas the Lord!
Did not our hearts feel all he deign’d to say,
Did they not burn within us by the way?

When You Take the Name of Jesus on Your Lips…

Are you depressed by reason of your sin?
Let not this discourage you, for his name is purposefully Jesus,
because he, and he alone, “shall save his people from their sins”
(Matthew 1:21).

Listen to the old Puritan, Robert Hawker (1753-1827 AD):
“My soul,what do you know practically and personally
of this most blessed name of your Savior?
It is one thing to have heard of him as Jesus,
and another to know him to be Jesus…
Have you simply heard of Jesus or have you received him as Jesus
to the salvation of your soul?
Is not the very name of Jesus most precious to you?”

When you take the name of Jesus upon your lips,
you remind yourself that almighty God is eternally committed to your salvation. When you take the name of Emmanuel on your lips,
you are reminding yourself that God is perpetually with you.

Sex Life

Here are some mp3s and seminar notes of talks given to our church community back in 2014 during our Christian Life Conference. If you listen to one, I would strongly encourage you to listen to the last one – Sandy Willson speaking on “Homosexuality and the Christian.” The others are helpful as well depending on where you are personally.

Here are links to the talk with notes regarding what the Bible has to say about our sexuality.

Recovering from Sexual Sins: The Jesus Way – Mitchell Moore

Christian Sexuality – Sandy Willson

Single Sexuality – Barton Kimbro

Married Sexuality – Dick Cain
Link to Word document

Christian Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage – Todd Erickson

Rearing Christian in a Sexualized Society – Dick Cain

Homosexuality and the Christian – Sandy Willson

My Dissertation on Praying the Psalms

Some of you have asked recently about how to access online my dissertation I wrote on Recovering One of the Lost Tools of Christianity Spirituality: Praying the Psalms It can be downloaded by clicking on the above link. Chapters one and eight are the chapters most frequently downloaded.

William Wallace, Jesus Christ & The Fire of Virtue

William Wallace

This is the statue of William Wallace, the esteemed freedom fighter of Scotland. After Wallace’s death, his successor Robert the Bruce begged to see his commander before he was buried:

“Show me that heroic face from whose beams my heart first caught the fire of virtue!”

May the Lord unveil to us that face that is the fairest and most beautiful of them all and may we caught the fire of virtue! 2 Corinthians 4:6 – For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

A Few Great Quotes from Augustine on Worship

1600-Augustine-HippoAugustine: “You made us for yourself, and our hearts find no peace till they rest in you.”

“He loves Thee too little who loves anything together with Thee, which he loves
not for Thy sake.”

“If the things of this world delight you, praise God for them but turn your love
away from them and give it to their Maker, so that the things that please you
may not displease Him.”

John Piper:

Are we in bondage to the pleasures of this world so that, for all our talk about the glory of God, we love television and food and sleep and sex and money and human praise just like everybody else? If so, let us repent and fix our faces like flint toward the Word of God. And let us pray: ‘O Lord, open my eyes to see the
sovereign sight that in your presence is fullness of joy and at your right hand are pleasures forevermore’ (Psalm 16:11).

The Legacy of Sovereign Joy: God’s Triumphant Grace in the Lives of Augustine, Luther and Calvin

The Wonder of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ – Augustine of Hippo

Augustine of HippoMan’s maker was made man,
that He, Ruler of the stars,
might nurse at His mother’s breast;
that the Bread might hunger,
the Fountain thirst,
the Light sleep,
the Way be tired on its journey;
that the Truth might be accused of false witness,
the Teacher be beaten with whips,
the Foundation be suspended on wood;
that Strength might grow weak;
that the Healer might be wounded;
that Life might die.

– Augustine of Hippo (Sermons 191.1)